Teaching a #MOOC

The ‘E-Learning and Digital Cultures’ Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) officially launched yesterday.  Having participated in a number of MOOCs as a student, this venture from the University of Edinburgh will provide my first experience of teaching such a course, alongside my esteemed colleagues.  We will be blogging our...

The Limitations of &...

An edited version of this post has been published here: Knox, J. (2013). The Limitations of Access Alone: moving towards open processes in education. Open Praxis. 5(1). pp. 21-29. Abstract ‘Openness’ has emerged as one of the foremost themes in education, within which an open education movement has enthusiastically...

Books as Actors – fo...

After some weeks of experimentation, I have a working prototype for an idea I’ve been exploring related to the notion of giving books some kind of agency in the development of a learning space.  As it stands, the system allows a book being read in my PhD office to automatically add content to the web, content that is...

Urban – wind – drift Jul09

Urban – wind &...

On June 19th I participated in an art and anthropology workshop, which was part of a social science conference at Edinburgh University. The task was to choose an object of research, and think about how it can be documented. With typical obstreperousness towards the social sciences, I joined a group who seemed to be interested...

Five critiques of th...

This is an Author’s Original Manuscript of an article whose final and definitive form, the Version of Record, has been published in the Teaching in Higher Education 2013 [copyright Taylor & Francis], available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/[ DOI:10.1080/13562517.2013.774354]. Knox, J. (2013) Five Critiques of...

The Round Table R...

Continued work with Twitter data from the September to December period of the change11 MOOC course has got me thinking about what kind of interpretations might be made from particular forms of visualisation.  With the proviso that the simplest is sometimes the best, I have become increasingly attracted to the...

Twitter Visualisatio...

Some initial visualisations emerging during September – December 2011 in the online course changeMOOC.  These were developed using NodeXL.  Vertices are participants, edges are connections between: mentions are coloured blue, while ReTweets are in maroon.  Click each image for a higher resolution (500×500). 1....

Susan Greenfield ...

While I enjoyed some of the first section of Susan Greenfield’s recent talk on ‘The Internet and ‘mind-change’, drawing some relations between the theories of plasticity in neuroscience and notions of learning and development, the later phase appeared to contain an inordinate number of questionable...

Confessing to MIT x

A recent article about the proposed MITx published some of the issues raised by academic staff about the new open education project. Interestingly, these concerns included some questions about how potential students can be authenticated: ‘Well, you want MIT to give you a certificate, how do we know who the learner is? How...

(Posthuman) Subjecti...

Re-reading the excellent paper ‘Objectivity in Educational Research’ by Elliot Eisner has got me thinking about how the tendencies in educational research relate to antihumanism and posthumanism. In particular, a reference to the correspondence theory of truth has interested me, in terms of how it relates to ideas...

Diagramming the axes...

Diagramming the asse...

Diagramming the assemblage: a blog post on...

MOOC Discourse

How is the MOOC presented, and what can this posture tell us about the perceptions of education, knowledge and technology?  The following video from Dave Cormier outlines the educational ethos of the MOOC, and the choice of language reveals much about the theoretical and philosophical stances that underpin this course...

Looking again at Ope...

The Open Course Ware project from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is acknowledged as the prime example of the OER movement (Atkins et al., 2007)⁠. MIT pioneered the strategy of making course materials freely accessible on the web, and remains the academic institution most committed to the open courseware strategy. ...

Assumptions in dista...

This post is hopefully the start of some more succinct thinking about the assumptions prevalent in the presentation and marketing of distance and digitally mediated education by educational institutions and learning providers. There appears to be a particular focus for the marketing of ‘e-learning’, comprising of a...

Body as document of ...

After some recent discussions about the use of documents in social science research, I have been reconsidering what might be useful to classify as a ‘document’ of the web. Given that web is itself predominantly a mass of hyperlinked ‘documents’, in the traditional sense of two-dimensional representations...

Social Media in Educ...

I thoroughly enjoyed the Social Media and Academia panel on 21st September, as part of Social Media Week in Glasgow. The event was arranged masterfully by Edinburgh Beltane, Nicola Osborne at Edina, and hosted at the University of Glasgow Library. The panel members put forward some fascinating projects, and a useful discussion...

Approaching ‘v...

The question of how to conducting research online, whether qualitative or quantitative in nature, remains a pertinent issue. I have been reading Virtual Methods by Christine Hine (2005) this week and pondering the complexities of approaching a project that involves the collection and/or analysis of web-related data. For Hine,...